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Montessori School of Greater Lafayette Blog


Insights and inspiration from our Montessori classrooms.rss


 

Thanks to the timeless quality of Montessori materials, it seems that only the faces have changed in these photos from MSGL classrooms in 2000.

It's a genuine Polaroid photo and the genuine Mr. Jeff.
It's a genuine Polaroid photo and the genuine Mr. Jeff presenting abstract computations with the Stamp Game.

 


We still use the same dishwashing stands in the classroom today.

 


Miss Chloe has been preparing the environment at MSGL for a long time.

 


The Unifix Cubes are not a Montessori material but they allow for counting, sorting, color recognition, and provide a clear control of error. 

 


It just feels good to put the colored pencils in their matching holders.

 


Taking the spindles out of the boxes reinforces the counting activity used to put them in - and it builds concentration.

 


Two friends can work together on the Teen Boards. They are matching the quantity with the symbol and witing the numerals.

 


Using scissors is classified as a language activity because it builds hand-eye coordination and strengthens the hand muscles required for writing.

 


A comfy chair is better when it's big enough for two.

 


And finally, what is Steve building? 

I hope that was as fun for you as it was for me! Have a warm and wonderful Wednesday.   ~Heather


 

     Let's recap our Building MSGL series on Wayback Wednesday. Montessori Parents, Inc. purchased the Calvary Baptist Church on Soldiers Home Road in 1999. Demolition of the interior began in September, 2000. Now it's December, 2000 and the stud walls are in place so that wiring, plumbing, and drywall work can begin.

 


Looking toward the Oak Room in Building B.

 


Standing in Catalpa looking through the wall into the Oak Room.

 


Looking out the door of the Maple Room into the office hallway.

 


Here's the view walking in the office door.

 


Here's that same view just a couple of months later.

 


This is the Maple Room looking toward the stairs.

 


This is the Willow Room looking toward the kitchen area.


And here is the Spruce Room filled with drywall supplies.

 


The Harvey & Son Construction crew. Steve, Don, Nolan, and Tony working over Thanksgiving Break.

 

That's all for this week. Have a terrific Wednesday!

 


 

     If there truly is a flashback movie that plays in our heads just before we die, the remodeling of the MSGL buildings will certainly be a part of mine. And the sweaty people covered in dust will be in it too, smiling (mostly) like they were in these photos from the first week of demolition.

     The following pictures represent some of my favorite memories of the building project because we were all so young and optimistic. We didn't truly grasp what working for six months through the winter with no electricity and no toilets and no babysitters would be like. So many parents, teachers, spouses, and extended family members gave their days off and their nights and weekends to prepare this space to be our new and improved Montessori School of Greater Lafayette.  They did it for free and, most importantly, they did it with a sense of humor.


Dragging the folding partitions out of the basement. 

     The above photo brings to mind a particularly disheartening day. The church basement was divided up into classrooms by these heavy, orange, folding partitions. Before we could start cutting into the concrete floors and tearing out the ceilng, we had to remove all of these partitions. Did I mention that they were extremely heavy? So heavy, in fact, that we couldn't move them once we got them detached and rolled up on the floor. I recall seeing Craig Lamb, Beth Nichols, and Tony Harvey pushing on them with all of their might and they just weren't budging. The wise, manly men in our group decided to drag them out of the basement using the Bobcat. Don Harvey did just that. As Tony, project manager, recalled, "That part of the demolition was really brutal. You would go in and see what was going to beat the heck out of you that day."


 

     Just like in a Montessori classroom, every volunteer found a niche. Some of the parents didn't want to see anything go to waste, so they took out the light fixtures and the doors and anything that might be of value and marked it for a remodeling sale we had a few weeks later. 


Ellie's mom is organizing the salvaged items in the future toddler room.

     One of the reasons we had such a dedicated group of volunteers is that demolition work is really fun! After a long day we could put on our grubby clothes and work gloves, grab a Wonder Bar and tear into the drywall and studs.


Ron and Cathy Stier.

 


Brian Berndt.

 


Beth working in the future River Birch room.

 


Beth and Cathy take out nails so we could re-use the studs.

 


Tools like the Sawzall made the job a lot more fun. This volunteer is standing in what is now the Willow room.

 


Tony unloads another wheelbarrow of debris.

 


Water girls, Gaia and Grace.

 


The author was concerned about lawn maintenance.

     I was really worried that the lawn would grow too long and we would look like bad neighbors. This was the first and last time I mowed the entire campus with a push mower.

 

     That week was lots of fun, but I'm glad it's done. Have a great Wednesday!

Heather