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Montessori School of Greater Lafayette Blog


Insights and inspiration from our Montessori classrooms.rss

Heather Harvey
Heather Harvey

 Heather Harvey is the Media and Staff Coordinator at the Montessori School of Greater Lafayette.

She has an AMS Early Childhood Credential and worked as an assistant and lead teacher at MSGL from 2000 to 2013. To read Heather's full bio, click here.

 



 

We're keeping things simple on Wayback Wednesday this week with a short and sweet little collection of photos from October, 2002. Teacher Judy West took the children of the Red Oak class on a nature hike to Purdue's Horticulture Park to enjoy the crisp morning, collect leaves, and hug some very deserving trees. 

 
 Berries for collecting, not for eating.

 
 

 
 Making a bark rubbing.

 

 
 

 

 
 Waiting for the chipmunk to make an appearance.

 

 
 

 

 
 

 

 
 

Do you have favorite photos you would like to share on Wayback Wednesday? Please contact me at heather@msgl.org. Have an outstanding Wednesday!


 

Today is school picture day! 

 
 Harriet tries to convince Ian to blow that silly ducky off her head.

When Harriet and "the ducky" show up to take our pictures, you can bet that the children are well-dressed, the snack is no-mess, and the staff is slightly stressed - for two whole days. Sometimes there are tears and pouty faces, but never in front of the children :)

These teachers from 2004 look pretty happy. Enjoy this week's Wayback Wednesday photos from 2004.  

 
Spruce Toddler class 3-day and 5-day 
Teachers Cheryl Whiteman, Lena Schurr, Karen Bernier,

 
 Spruce Toddler Class 2-day and 5-day
Teachers Jennifer Tyrell, Cheryl Whiteman, Lena Schurr, Karen Bernier.

 
 Red Oak Preprimary Class
Teachers: Erica Wallskog and Judy West.

 
 Willow Preprimary Class
Teachers Ana Orizondo, and Jessica Burdge,
 
 Catalpa Preprimary Class
Teachers Ginny Meyer and Revati Nemani.
 
 White Oak Preprimary 2-day and 5-day Class
Teachers Judy West and Janice Schuster,
 
 White Oak Preprimary 3-day and 5-day Class
Teachers Judy West and Janice Schuster.

 
 Globe Willow Bilingual Preprimary Class
Teachers Ana Orizondo and Veda Chandrasekar,
 
 Catalpa Pods Kindergarten
Teachers Ginny Meyer, Angie Shamo, and Heather Harvey.

 
 Hickory Elementary Class
Teachers Linda Bolam, Linda Teller, and Kelly Haley,
 

 


Smile, silly ducky! And have a terrific Wednesday.


 

The MSGL photo archives are a bit disorganized and I usually have to sift through them to come up with a Wayback Wednesday post, but this week the work was already done. After leading the toddler families on this field trip to Lafayette's Columbian Park Zoo in the Spring of 1998, teacher Suman Harshvardhan put together this little photo album for the children. 

 
 Look who's ready for a ride on the Columbian Park Express!

 

 
Suman makes sure everyone has a snack. The old Big Dipper slide can be seen in the background. The slide was dismantled when the park was renovated in the early 00's. Here's a photo of the slide in it's glory days...


 

 

 

 
 

 


 

 

These kiddos are college freshmen (or nearly) now. Thanks for reading and have a great Wednesday!



 

 


 

We're really reaching back here for Halloween gold - all the way back to 1989. Back in the day, the whole school had a costume parade in the Morton Center gymnasium. It was a big year for bunnies, clowns, and superheroes. 


 
 1989 costume parade in the Morton gymnasium.



 
1989 costume party in Room D.


 
1989 - Long-time teacher Durga Desai and Room A's costume parade.


 
 1990 - An apparently fabulous convocation with art, pumpkins, and puppets.

 
 2000? - Briana Hinds scrubbing a pumpkin in Cathy Stier's ADP class.


 
 2000? - Toddler class Halloween party. Mason Arndt facing camera.


 
 2001? - A Halloween tradition - Ginny Meyer greeting the children dressed in her spider costume.

 
2003 - Becca and Tessa Farmer, Grace Harvey, Catherine Chua, Hannah Hawkins & friends at a Montessori family Halloween party.

The classrooms don't dress in costumes as much anymore, but they usually go on field trips to the pumpkin patch.

 
 2004 - Miss Jennifer and the Toddler class carving a pumpkin.


 
 2004 - Darby B., Hannah D., and Bridget O. on a field trip to the pumpkin patch with Ana Orizondo's Willow class.


 
 2004 -Zoe with her treasured but kind of icky pumpkin.


 
 2005 - Revati Nemani helps a friend with the parts of the pumpkin work in Catalpa.



 2008 - Dana Adamson carving a pumpkin with River Birch children.


 
 2009 - Heather Harvey carving a pumpkin with River Birch class the following year.


 
 2010 - Elementary class goes to the pumpkin patch.


 
 2010 - Emma and Zach scoop out the pumpkin guts.


 
 2011 - Ashton's big haul from the pumpkin patch trip with Canoe Birch.


 
 2011 - Anita Trent helps carry Red Oak pumpkins from the patch to the bus.


 
 2012 - Willow class friends share a special fall party treat.


I hope you have enjoyed our first-ever Halloween edition of Wayback Wednesday. If you know anyone in these photos and want to share their names with us (or our website with them) we would really appreciate it. Have fun tomorrow and I hope you get lots and lots of candy - or not. Whichever you prefer :)

 

First, I will start with what I saw this week. This was my favorite moment. 

 
 “Trees are much like human beings and enjoy each other's company. Only a few love to be alone.” - Jens Jensen, Siftings, 1939

 

Another photo. If you are familiar with Humans of New York, the book and website by Brandon Stanton, then I know you can relate. If not, I know you can relate.

 

 
This week in microfashion. Did she choose the paint or did the paint choose her?

 

Children dress so fabulously and so beautifully because they have not yet learned that other people are judging their choices. They wear what they like. I want to wear what I like but I feel childish. How old will I grow before I truly understand that being childish is the truest way to be?

 

 

And, one more photo.

 
 What does it feel like the moment just before your mom wraps her arms around you?

 

 

 

And now, for what I heard.   

 

1. I erroneously asked a child how she was enjoying her Kindergarten year at MSGL. She responded, "I'm not IN Kindergarten. That's why I'm HERE!"

 

2. "That's a small story."

 

3. A friend was reading me a note from his lunch box. "Look! Look it! It says I'm going to my grandma's house. And I think I'm gonna get a Spiderman hat when we go to the store."

 

4. "Yeah. Let's do our maps."

 

5. "Where's the damn lizard?"

 

 
 File photo.

Rest easy. That darned lizard was found. 

 
What did you hear this week at MSGL? We hope you'll tell us.
 
Have a terrific weekend!

 

 


 
Do you recognize anyone in this photo of the MSGL staff from 1992? We have grown from a staff of 12 in 1992 to over 30 today, 21 years later. 

Montessori School of Greater Lafayette Staff, 1992

 
 Back, l to r: Suman Harshvardhan, Toddler class; Nakhat Ahmad, Class D; Karen Weddle, Toddler & ADP; Mary Sue Reutebuch, Class E; Durga Desai, Class A; Vicky Carswell, Early Arrival. Front, l to r: Linda Swain,  B & Extended Day; Ginny Meyer, Class B & Extended Day; Anita McKinney, Executive Director; Maureen , Class A; Cathy Stier, ADP. Not pictured: Judy West, Class D.


Here are the year's class photos. If you recognize any of the children, all should be in their mid-twenties now, consider directing them here. We would love to hear from them and from the teachers.


Class A - Morning Preprimary, 1992

 
 Teachers Maureen Northacker (L) and Durga Desai (R).



Class B - Morning Preprimary, 1992

 
 Teachers Linda Swain (L) and Ginny Meyer (R).

 

 


Class D - Morning Preprimary, 1992

 
  Teachers Judy West (L) and Nakhat Ahmad (R).

       

 

Class E - Afternoon Preprimary, 1992

 
Teacher Mary Sue Reutebuch 



Class C - 3-day and 5-day Toddlers, 1992

 
 Teachers Karen Weddle, Suman Harshvardhan, and Prafull Rathore.

 

Class C - 2-day Toddlers, 1992

 
 Teachers Karen Weddle, Suman Harshvardhan, and Prafull Rathore.



Class - Extended Day Afternoon, 1992
 
Teachers Ginny Meyer (L) and Linda Swain (R). 

Thanks for reading and have a great Wednesday!


 




 
Winter Clothing Alert!

The s-word is in our forecast this week. I don't know anyone who is happy about the October SNOW except for my allergy-suffering friends. With the snow come cold temperatures and at MSGL we play outside year-round, so it's important for children to have warm and practical clothing to wear every day. For the past 12 years I greeted the children on the playground at 8:30 am, snow or shine. To help you prepare for this week and the next six months (it hurts me to say that), I have compiled for you:

Miss Heather's Top 10 List for Child Comfort and Parent Happiness: Winter Edition

1. Check the forecast. Every class - Toddler through Elementary - goes outside when the temperature is 20 degrees Fahrenheit or above. Check the weather forecast each day before leaving the house to make sure your child will have the appropriate cold-weather gear for that day.

2. Go with the low. Consider the time of day your child will be outside. The forecast may call for a high temp. of 63 degrees, but the temperature at 8:30 am might only be in the 40's. Some classes start outside, some go out at 10:15, some at 11:00. The afternoon and Elementary classes go out at varying times throughout the week. Provide clothing for the day's low temperature and your child should be well-prepared.


3. Layer, layer, layer. Imagine your child as a cute, rosy-cheeked onion and help her dress in layers. Being hot and sweaty outside in the cold is just as uncomfortable as shivering. If your child can take off a sweater or push back her hood and unzip her coat, she will be able to regulate her body temperature and still enjoy the time outside. 


4. Listen to your child. Trust your child to make decisions about his comfort. The only way we can learn if we are too cold is if we are allowed to feel the cold. If your child doesn't want to wear his gloves, don't sweat it. Make sure he knows his gloves are in his locker and that he can go get them if he gets cold. The same goes for his snow pants and his bulky winter coat. An active child dressed in layers with warm shoes and a hat can generally enjoy himself outside without danger of getting too cold, even in winter. If your child is listening to his body instead of chafing under a "mitten mandate" he is more likely to develop a true sense of how to dress for the weather. My friend "Z" always told his dad he didn't want to wear his coat or his snow pants or his gloves, but 10 minutes after dad left, Z would ask to go get them. 


5. Start a discussion. Talk with your child about the day's weather and how to dress. Remember that the ultimate goals are safety and independence. You might say something like, "It's 30 degrees Fahrenheit. You definitely need to wear something on your hands, but you can choose if you wear your Spiderman gloves or the mittens Grandma made for you." Or try, "It's going to be 45 degrees when you go outside today. What should you pack for school?" Young children can learn to speak three languages at once. They can also learn to make clothing choices based on the outdoor temperature. 

 

6. Get a move-on. Remember that your child is most likely playing actively outside. We might feel very cold walking from the car to the school door in a suit or a skirt and heels, but a child riding a balance bike for 10 minutes heats up very quickly.

7. Consider cold pants. Snow pants or snow suits are essential when there is snow on the ground, but some children (and some preschool teachers) like to wear them as soon as they can see their breath outside. Think of them as "cold pants" and let your child keep them in his locker from October through April.


8. Label everything. Speaking of lockers, our lockers are small. When two children share a locker it's nearly impossible to fit snow pants, coats, book bags and lunch boxes inside. PLEASE make sure every article of clothing you send to school has your child's name or your family's last name written on it where it's easy to read. All black snow pants and all Spiderman gloves look the same when there are 24 children getting dressed in the hallway. If you forget, your child's teacher will be happy to loan you a Sharpie and some masking tape. 


9. Embrace the terrific outdoors. Spending time outdoors is important for everyone's health and well-being. We do not have a gym and children may not stay inside by themselves. If your child is recovering from an illness and you don't want her to be outside, please make arrangements to drop her off late or pick her up early, depending on the class schedule. 


10. Stock up. Have extra winter clothing on hand, if possible. The first Snow Day of the year is much less fun when your child has left her snow pants at school. And plan to lose at least one set of gloves. If you buy three identical sets of gloves, odds are you will have at least one matching set at the end of the year. Just in case, the Lost and Found box is in the office.

If you recently moved to West Lafayette from somewhere warm and lovely, I am so sorry! But seriously, you can stock up on all the clothing your family needs to get through your first Indiana winter at J.C. Penney, Sears, Target, KMart, or Walmart. You can purchase gently-used childrens' outerwear at Once Upon a Child in Lafayette.

Below are some examples of items your child will need.

  Winter coat 
  Snow pants - OR - 
   Snow bib overalls
  Waterproof gloves - OR - 
  Waterproof mittens 
  Waterproof snowboots
  Soft, warm cap

Thanks for reading and bring on the snow! 



 


 
Wayback Wednesday: 1998 - Peter Cottontails and Banana Bombs

1998 was a big year for MSGL because we announced our expansion so we received lots of media coverage. This week's Wayback Wednesday post features another story from the Lafayette Journal and Courier. On July 7th, a story about our summer camp cooking class filled the 4 Kidz Only page. (I love that the J&C embraced phonetic spelling!)

The photos are beautiful and the children's quotes, especially about date math, are really sweet.

Featured teacher, Revati Nemani is still with MSGL today in the Catalpa class. The children featured in this article are now in college. Are any of them studying to be chefs? We would love to know. If you know Alie Magnante, Daniel Plesniak, Asher Bogdanove, or Andrew Staiger, please pass this along. It would be great to hear from them.

And maybe you and your young ones will give one of these recipes a go? We would love to hear about that, too. 

 

 


 

..and this was its steeple.

 

 
 Don Harvey and Tony Harvey ready the steeple for removal. 

When we remodeled the former Calvary Baptist Church in 2000-2001 to become our Montessori school, we had to replace a few fixtures. The steeple was detached from the roof and lowered by crane to the parking lot below.

  

 

    What do you do with a second-hand steeple? We gave it to a church down the road. 


     The demolition crew also removed the fiberglas baptistry by cutting it into pieces. All of the beautiful wood pews were sold. You can see one being used today in the school office. The colored windows were eventually replaced with clear glass. 


     This is what Building B looks like today. 

Have a great Wednesday!


 
You're Invited: Bringing Montessori Home

 

Bringing Montessori Home

You are your child’s first teacher! 


     It is important to say that you are your child's most important and influential teacher. You set the tone for your child's love of learning from the very start and it is you who bridges the gap between school and home. Sometimes this can feel overwhelming. 

     So please join us for "Bringing Montessori Home," a Parent Development Opportunity on Wednesday, October 9th from 6:30-8:00 pm. Kelly Sallee will be presenting ideas you can use and materials you can make to prepare a home environment that will nurture your child's independence. We hope you might also share how you use the Montessori philosophy to help your child be successful in your home. Register in the office or call or email info@msgl.org today!







Date: Wednesday, Oct. 9th

Time: 6:30-8:00 pm

Location: MSGL

Classroom: To Be Decided

Childcare available - call, 
sign up in office or email Lena at info@msgl.org.

We hope to see you there!


 


 

This post was originally published on September 24, 2013.

    Two years ago, before their daughter was even old enough to enroll at MSGL, Zoe Neal and Desiree Chuang made an historic donation to our school. Owners of Virtuous Cycles in downtown Lafayette, Zoe and Desiree gave us a bright orange Strider balance bike to try out on the tricycle track. It soon became the most beloved of all the bikes because it is the only two-wheeler and it has no pedals. And most importantly, it goes FAST! Well, it goes as fast as the square bike track will allow and with all of the tricycle traffic? The bike track is sometimes more like the intersection of 52 and Salisbury when Purdue heads home for the day. Still, it feels really fast.


Old School    

     On the bikes of my youth and quite possibly yours, I learned to pedal with a set of training wheels attached to the hub of the back wheel to keep the bike, and me, upright. I learned to pedal the bike but never felt what it was like to be truly balanced on two wheels. When the training wheels came off I wasn't really ready at all. I had to learn to balance, and quickly! - and my parents had to watch. Spoiler alert: we all survived. 

The author with her first set of wheels.

New School     

     Balance bikes let a child master the balancing part - the most challenging part - of riding a bike, first. When you are coasting on a Strider bike with your feet not touching the ground it feels exactly like riding a bike. You ARE riding the bike, you're just not pedaling it. And since many children already learned to pedal on a tricycle the year before, the two skills of balancing and pedaling come together nicely after they have mastered the Strider. Several online reviews point out that if a child can walk she can ride a balance bike, so some children skip the tricycle stage altogether.

     Maria Montessori observed the importance of a child developing his sense of balance. She created activities such as walking on the line to help fine-tune this sense. At MSGL the Strider is an extension of that balance exercise.

     Last year, the Franklin family donated a new, dark blue Strider and now the children can have a turn to ride in half the time. That's important because learning to have a turn and to wait for a turn is one of the biggest works of preschool. The children at MSGL and their teachers have come up with an almost fool-proof system for taking turns on the Striders and all the bikes. It came to be called the "waiting bench." 

The Waiting Bench

Miss Angie and friends on the waiting bench on a cold, cold day.

     The waiting bench is right next to the bike shed which is sort of the starting line of the bike track. The first two children take the bikes out of the shed and ride them. When another friend wants a turn, he sits on the waiting bench. This signals the riders that someone is waiting for a turn so they need to consider how many more laps they will take before handing the bike off to the next friend. Sometimes the rider stops riding and negotiates with the waiter.

Waiter: How many more times are you going to go around?

Rider: 10

Waiter: That's too many! How about 7?

Rider: How about 5? (When you're learning numbers and quantity, it's sometimes more important to pick a number you like than to negotiate for the most turns. Negotiation skills improve with experience :)

     Once an agreement has been reached, the rider continues his laps while the waiter and his friends count down from 5 to 1. At the hand-off between rider and waiter, the cycle is repeated with new riders. Sometimes there are misunderstandings and an experienced child steps in to mediate. A teacher is always nearby to see what is happening and make herself available to help, if needed.

     The idea of the waiting bench just sort of happened, like lots of great things happen in child-centered environments. It's possible that the teachers could have made an arbitrary rule about each child getting only 5 turns, but that would diminish the child's ability to make choices and consider the feelings of others. For example, 5-year-olds can recognize a child who is struggling with being patient and they will sometimes hand the bike over early to help this child. This leads to another cycle that I call the "Cycle of Benevolence." Benevolence is an inclination to perform kind, charitable acts. When a child sees a peer giving freely of herself to make someone else happy, it feels good. Soon, that child is looking for a way to help a friend. The cycle repeats and those kind acts and good feelings spill over into the community and, ultimately, the whole wide world.


     Heike Larson, an administrator and blogger at Leport School in California, writes frequently of the importance of fostering benevolence in preschool communities. All of us at MSGL are inspired by her blog. She has also written about balance bikes on the Leport Schools blog here.

     If you are considering buying a balance bike for your child, be sure to visit Virtuous Cycles to check out their selection of models and colors. Tell them MSGL sent you and be a part of the Cycle.


 

     This post was originally published on September 27, 2013.

Families are drawn to Montessori schools for many different reasons. Sometimes parents are looking to continue in preschool the child-centered environment they have established at home. Others wish to see their children thrive in the our enriched classrooms. Still, other families choose Montessori preschools because they want their children to learn and socialize in a non-competitive environment. Whatever the reason parents choose Montessori, they often have many questions during their child's first year.


  To help answer these questions, MSGL offers a 1 ½-hour Montessori Basics class each Fall and all new families are expected to attend. Preprimary teacher Kelly Sallee presented this year’s class on September 25th to a packed house of over 40 parents and grandparents. Kelly focused her presentation on the Prepared Environment, the Sensitive Periods of a child's development, and the Role of the Teacher. If you were unable to attend this year's Basics, follow this link to read more about Kelly's presentation. Below are a few tips for new parents.


Kelly's Tips for New Montessori Parents 


  • Do your best to control the environment, not the child. Organize the child's belongings to help him be independent and successful.


          
  • Don't worry if your child is unable to sit still or to focus for long periods. "Even when we feel they're not listening, they are learning."


     
    Speak to children at home in your native language. They will learn English at school.

  •       
  • What's in your child's cubby does not necessarily reflect their work because many activities have no "paper" component. Look at classroom photos and videos on SmugMug to see what the children are working on in class. Your child's teacher will also have this information available for you at parent/teacher conferences.



  • Give your child the gift of time. Try not to rush her through tasks. When a child is allowed to dress herself in the morning it may take longer but she will develop the skills necessary for independence.  



  • Allow your child to work without interruption, when possible. Periods of uninterrupted work strengthen a child's ability to concentrate for longer periods of time.



  • Allow your child to complete tasks without correction. "I don't know any adults who walk around with their shoes on the wrong feet. They will figure it out with time."



  • Give your child the opportunity to be a third-year student. Our mixed-age classrooms allow children to move from being the youngest who look up to role models to being the role models themselves. "Children who are the youngest in their families need the third year to be the leader that they don't get to be at home."


 

15 years ago the Lafayette Journal and Courier announced MSGL's plans to add an elementary program and move all of its programs to a new space. 

 

The Morton Community Center on Chauncey Avenue had been MSGL's home since 1985. 

As the article states, the new elementary program was originally going to be housed in a home on Rainbow Drive that had been donated by an MSGL family. A change of plans relocated that first class to some available classroom space inside the Temple Israel on Cumberland Avenue.


In February 2001, all of our programs, from the parent-infant class through elementary, moved into our permanent home in the former Calvary Baptist church on Soldiers Home Road. 

In 2007, the elementary classes moved into the Montessori House, a remodeled home adjacent to the campus.


MSGL has plans to expand once again in the near future to add a second toddler classroom and a gym/gross motor space.